Augmented reality glasses powered by Wikitude – Wikitude


AR Glasses

As mobile technology continues its rapid advancement according to Moore’s law, the possibilities of moving towards the sci-fi novels and films of yesteryear are becoming less and less fiction, and more reality. Augmented reality.

At Wikitude, we’re working everyday on making the future potential of mobile technology a reality now. We started out in 2008 as the first provider of augmented reality on smartphones, and since this time have spawned a revolution in the industry. It’s time to do it again with wearable AR technology.

Continue reading @ Augmented reality glasses powered by Wikitude – Wikitude.


Using Facebook could help boost exam grades

Using Facebook could help boost exam grades

Maps on smartphones: Lost

The criticism heaped on Apple shows the growing importance of cartography.

… Maps are becoming important strategic terrain. They are more than an aid to getting from A to B. Apps based on location—to summon a taxi, say—need maps inside them. Digital maps can include countless layers of information, plus advertisements from which money can be made. There are thousands of indoor maps, too, of airports, department stores and so forth. Smartphones also act as sensors, reporting their whereabouts, which can be used to improve maps. According to comScore, a data firm, in August 95% of American iPhone owners and 83% of owners of smartphones with Google’s Android operating system used a mobile map…

via Maps on smartphones: Lost | The Economist.

Wrong turn: Apples buggy iOS 6 maps lead to widespread complaints

By Nilay Patel and Adi Robertson

Apple has a maps problem.

The major new feature of the company’s new iOS 6 mobile operating system is a new mapping module developed by Apple itself — a replacement for the Google-supplied maps that have been standard on the iPhone since it debuted in 2007. It is a change borne not of user demand, but of corporate politics: Google’s Android platform is the biggest competitive threat to the iPhone, so Apple is cutting ties with Google. iPhone owners might have loved Google Maps, but Apple has no love for Google.

“It’s going to be messy for them.”

Unfortunately, Apple’s new maps are simply not as good as Google’s. The release of iOS 6 yesterday was immediately followed by users complaining about the…

Continue @ Wrong turn: Apples buggy iOS 6 maps lead to widespread complaints.

How Google Builds Its Maps—and What It Means for the Future of Everything

google maps

Behind every Google Map, there is a much more complex map that’s the key to your queries but hidden from your view. The deep map contains the logic of places: their no-left-turns and freeway on-ramps, speed limits and traffic conditions. This is the data that you’re drawing from when you ask Google to navigate you from point A to point B — and last week, Google showed me the internal map and demonstrated how it was built. It’s the first time the company has let anyone watch how the project it calls GT, or “Ground Truth,” actually works.

Google opened up at a key moment in its evolution. The company began as an online search company that made money almost exclusively from selling ads based on what you were querying for. But then the mobile world exploded. Where you’re searching from has become almost as important as what you’re searching for. Google responded by creating an operating system, brand, and ecosystem in Android that has become the only significant rival to Apple’s iOS.

And for good reason. If Google’s mission is to organize all the world’s information, the most important challenge — far larger than indexing the web — is to take the world’s physical information and make it accessible and useful.

“If you look at the offline world, the real world in which we live, that information is not entirely online,” Manik Gupta, the senior product manager for Google Maps, told me. “Increasingly as we go about our lives, we are trying to bridge that gap between what we see in the real world and [the online world], and Maps really plays that part.”

This is not just a theoretical concern. Mapping systems matter on phones precisely because they are the interface between the offline and online worlds. If you’re at all like me, you use mapping more than any other application except for the communications suite (phone, email, social networks, and text messaging).

Google is locked in a battle with the world’s largest company, Apple, about who will control the future of mobile phones. Whereas Apple’s strengths are in product design, supply chain management, and retail marketing, Google’s most obvious realm of competitive advantage is in information. Geo data — and the apps built to use it — are where Google can win just by being Google. That didn’t matter on previous generations of iPhones because they used Google Maps, but now Apple’s created its own service. How the two operating systems incorporate geo data and present it to users could become a key battleground in the phone wars.

But that would entail actually building a better map…

Continue @ How Google Builds Its Maps—and What It Means for the Future of Everything – Alexis C. Madrigal – The Atlantic.

How will Google Maps change our reality?

google maps

Much of the controversy surrounding Google Maps has centered on relatively concrete concerns like privacy and data gathering. But in a piece for The Guardian, Oliver Burkeman argues that digital mapping’s long-term impacts may fundamentally change the way we perceive and interact with the world around us. Aimless wandering, for instance, could easily become an antiquated practice, rendering Baudelaire’s flâneur as extinct as the dodo bird. And wouldn’t an ever-aggressive data onslaught further disconnect us from our environment?

Not every cartographer agrees with Burkeman’s hypothetical, arguing that Google Maps actually makes it easier for us to wander and “get lost,” since reorienting ourselves has become that much easier. But Burkeman’s core concern is more seismic in nature — namely, the fact that companies like Google (and, soon, Apple) have essentially assumed control over how we “see” the world, whether through digital maps or augmented reality. “What happens when we come to see the world, to a significant extent, through the eyes of a handful of big companies based in California?” Burkeman writes. “You don’t have to be a conspiracy theorist, or an anti-corporate crusader, to wonder about the subtle ways in which their values and interests might come to shape our lives.”

via How will Google Maps change our reality? | The Verge.

HTML5 vs. Apps: Why The Debate Matters, And Who Will Win


HTML5 is a new technology that allows developers to build rich web-based apps that run on any device via a standard web browser.

Many think it will save the web, rendering native platform-dependent apps obsolete.

So, which will win? Native apps or HTML5?

A recent report from BI Intelligence explains why we think HTML5 will win out, and what an HTML future will look like for consumers, developers, and brands.

via HTML5 vs. Apps: Why The Debate Matters, And Who Will Win – Business Insider.

OpenStreetMap 8th Anniversary Birthday party!

The OpenStreetMap 8th Anniversary Birthday party is an event which took place on Saturday, 18 August 2012 to celebrate the “birthday” of the project. Partying in several locations around the world!

via OpenStreetMap 8th Anniversary Birthday party – OpenStreetMap Wiki.

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